MOOC comparison

As I have better understanding about MOOCs in this study block, I am curious to take a closer look at different MOOC providers and know about their similarities and differences.  I have found a table from mooclab.com and it is worth looking into it as a start for comparison.  It is based on MOOC users’ experience and scoring to come up with the result.  To look at the top 5 overall rating, those are the “well known” ones which you / Jeremy have recommended in the course blog, except Saylor Academy I have never heard of.  I am amazed that Coursera has accumulated 23,000,000 users and has offered over 1,800 courses!

 

from Flickr http://flic.kr/p/SxdR4c
via IFTTT

Weekly Summary – Implications of online community communication

online community的圖片搜尋結果

This week I continue some inputs on online communities and I focus more on how people can be facilitated with the online community communications.  In Nielson’s article, it mentioned that 90% of online users are lurkers.  Another interesting point is about his observation about the power of online communities.  It states to

– Build personal relationshipsand networks of trust.

– Bring together peoplewith common interests or profiles.

–  Engagethese specific groups of people.

Thus, in order to bring people together virtually who never met before, and majority being Lurkers, they are attracted together with common interests and they can gradually build personal networks among themselves and they become more engaged with each other.  As mentioned by xxx, Lurkers have the potential “to become a newbie, a neo or neophate”.

My input on Starbucks online community can be an example.  Starbucks is encouraging customers to give voices and contribute to their online community.  It is “less commercial” to encourage customers to interact among themselves “Because we believe marvelous things happen when you put great coffee and great people together.”  This is an excellent example to demonstrate the 3 aspects about the power of online communities.

In addition to better engagement for online community members, Vala Afshar mentioned that 67% of companies collect ideas for new products or features directly from customers.  In digital education, to what extent can people create new ideas via online learning community?  This would be interesting to explore!

References:

Kozinets, R. V. (2010) Chapter 2 ‘Understanding Culture Online’, Netnography: doing ethnographic research online. London: Sage. pp. 21-40.

Nielsen, J. (2006).  “The 90-9-1 Rule for Participation Inequality in Social Media and Online Communities” by Neilson Norman Group

 

Online communities can generate new ideas!

from Twitter https://twitter.com/at108hk

February 21, 2017 at 12:29PM
via IFTTT

Starbucks is encouraging customers to give voices to their online community

This inspires me that when people are more collaboratively connected, they will be more eager to share and this makes people to learn from each other virtually.

from Twitter https://twitter.com/at108hk

February 21, 2017 at 12:27PM
via IFTTT

Power of online communities

from Twitter https://twitter.com/at108hk

February 21, 2017 at 12:23PM
via IFTTT

Weekly Summary – Some thoughts about online community

In this week’s summary my focus is on online community.  One of the very interesting findings I have is about learning the piano online.  I am very surprised to know that there are over 40,000 subscriptions for the YouTuber LessonsOnTheWeb!  The Youtuber delivered the class in YouTube as well as LiveStream.  It is somehow similar to MOOCs to offer free online piano learning to people in the world and it encourages learners to exchange ideas.

Online community can effectively share information and create value to the group.  In the case “Online community to deter crime”, the shop owner created the community originally to share and update some digital knowledge, and ultimately intended to promote their shop.  It then served the purpose to share crime information to their followers and successfully identified the thief with the help from other community members.  This inspires me that communities of practice is supposed to focus on a defined subject to share and discuss.  When common interest arises, this can be extended to other topics.

Another input this week is about generating revenue from online communities.  In the video, Patrick O’Keefe suggested methods of monetization ranging from direct advertising and affiliate links to classifieds, product sales and premium memberships.  In learning communities, this could also be promoting readings or conferences on certain topics for the target group.  I believe there can be more monetization possibilities especially with popularity of digital education.

MOOC的圖片搜尋結果

References:

There is a Place for Learning Piano Online: Community Discussion

https://t.co/BX4tDy5aP8

 Online community to deter crime

https://t.co/GNxCW06W2N

How to Monetize Your Online Community

https://t.co/dXBswMgzzl

 

The YouTuber LessonsOnTheWeb has over 40,000 subscriptions to learn playing piano online

Before this course, it is not new to me about people learning musical instruments via YouTube.  I am very surprised to know that there are over 40,000 subscriptions for the YouTuber LessonsOnTheWeb!  The Youtuber delivered the class in YouTube as well as LiveStream.  It targets to offer free  online piano learning to people in the world and it encourages learners to exchange ideas.  I now have an interesting idea – this learning mode is also a MOOC – Massive (having over 40,000 subscriptions), Open (everyone can join), Online (via Facebook and LiveStream) and Course (providing piano learning)!

— Angela Tsui (@at108hk) February 17, 2017

from Twitter https://twitter.com/at108hk

February 17, 2017 at 10:43AM
via IFTTT

How to Monetize Your Online Community

 

from Twitter https://twitter.com/at108hk

February 17, 2017 at 10:36AM
via IFTTT