Weekly summary – How can AI provide to human?

 

This week my blog inputs are more focused on AI technologies in which I find this topic very interesting.  Humans are spending huge effort and investment for advanced technology.  It now comes to the stage that there is low, or even no, difference between how a computer / robot performs and what humans do.

Kismet, the robot created by M.I.T. is no longer new to me after looking into the cyberculture topic for some weeks.  Kismet is a robot who interacts with humans through her body posture and facial expressions. The aim of this project is to explore social interactions between humans and robots and also between the humans themselves.

Another example is AlphaGo which has been created with extensive training with human and computer play on chess games.  One of the most well known news is the winning over world champion in 2016 and also recently in January 2017.

AI is providing many advancement to our life, interacting with robots who can interact, behave and socialize like humans.  However, sometimes people prefer “natural” rather than “artificial”.  The example of plastic surgery teaser is a perfect demonstration.  The joke implies that people actually prefer natural and inborn beauty rather than that obtained by plastic surgery.  The posthumanism results in an embarrassing situation for the model who only starred in the advertisement for a plastic surgery clinic.

 

References:

Brennan, Siofra (2015) Model who was ridiculed online after starring in a plastic surgery advert that was turned into a ‘cruel’ meme is SUING after claiming it ruined her life
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3312405/Model-s-life-ruined-image-turned-internet-meme.html

 

Google’s Deep Mind Explained! – Self Learning A.I.

 

 

One Reply to “Weekly summary – How can AI provide to human?”

  1. Thanks for your week 3 summary, Angela.

    ‘It now comes to the stage that there is low, or even no, difference between how a computer / robot performs and what humans do.’

    While I agree that there is lot of interesting work taking place around artificial intelligence that blur the boundaries of human and machine – as you touched on with some of your lifestream content – I think we need to be wary of making very bold statements that there’s now no difference between human and robot performance. Although artificial intelligence isn’t my own subject, I doubt that my colleagues across the campus who are working in this field would suggest that their research has reached the stage where there’s now little or no difference between the actions of human and machine. As we’ve seen in some our discussions around the film depictions of cyberculture, things are more entangled and more complex.

    ‘AI is providing many advancement to our life, interacting with robots who can interact, behave and socialize like humans. However, sometimes people prefer “natural” rather than “artificial”. The example of plastic surgery teaser is a perfect demonstration.’

    I found your example here (the image in the lifestream) really intriguing. For me it raised a number of ethical issues around plastic surgery for the purpose of beauty, as the story seemed to suggest. I also liked your nuanced take on what is ‘natural’ and ‘artificial’: as you suggest, these are complex terms. After all, as we’ve seen in some of the readings and conversations over the last few weeks, where do we draw the line between what is artificial and what is natural?

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