Comment on Ethnography chat with Dan by Daniel Jackson-Yang

Well, a couple of things here.

I find the wording of the title interesting. I don’t think I would ever use twitter to chat. It’s far to restrictive in word count terms. I would probably say “exchange”.

The amount of detail I go into in my Netography reflects what is going on in my offline life. I have a fairly undemanding job, no kids and a wife that I suspect is a workaholic (as most budding academics are). Consequently I think I have more time to write than other EDC students. Your own posts are succinct and thoughtful (I read the recent ones on openess and anonymity in nethnography). They seem to conclude nicely whereas mine kind of tail off a bit. I don’t really draft much and with no word count just tend to ramble until I feel I’ve had enough. Another reason why I have written a lot.

I also suspect that other people have been skyping or using student hangouts more. I tend to write more on my own.

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https://t.co/WmK7yKfuFx also the EDC paper of choice appears to be the guardian. Probably reflecting socio-economic status of cohort. — Daniel Jackson-Yang (@dabjacksonyang) February 28, 2017 {LinkToTweet}

Final Assessment – Open “letter” to my tutor

Hello Jeremy,

 

I’ve been thinking about the final assessment. A while back I listened to a talk by James Loxley from the History department http://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/uneasy-dreams-becoming-digital-scholarship. Following this I decided to try out the app that was produced as a result of his research. I documented the experience in a sort of Digital Ethnographic manner:

https://youtu.be/8_3-2ZsSBuA

As you can see where possible in the video I have tried to make my commentary link back to the readings and themes from the course.

During the editing process I had a chance to talk to Bill Jenkins about the Curious Edinburgh app he has been involved in making. I was intending to make another video documenting me and my wife using it with a similar commentary.

For the final assessment I was thinking of perhaps producing a video comparing and reviewing the two apps. Much in the manner of vlogging reviews e.g.: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QOqgk-j-pNI

I am trying to settle on a question that will allow me to structure the review. I was thinking maybe “How can digital, networked media be used to represent formal academic knowledge?: Two contrasting      app-roaches”

What is an acceptable length of video for the assessment? Depending on how much footage I am allowed to submit I will either include the raw “app experience” videos as part of my life stream or as part of the final assessment. I intend to reference the final submission video by adding hyperlink popups at any point I mention an academic text. As this is a bit laborious I would probably not do that for the “raw” videos if they are only going to be part of the life stream. I could also add some video chapter markers to help you as a marker to skip to the most pertinent comments. I think perhaps an additional criteria could be ease of navigation. In IDEL the additional criteria were optional. Is that the case here?

 

Cheers

Dan

Comment on My mini-ethnography about a MOOC by Daniel Jackson-Yang

It’s a really nice metaphor though and you seem to have nailed the thinglink format in your first try. One thing that I was curious about was the first B statement “Everyone comes in equal”. This would be quite a problematic statement for me if left as it is. Everyone comes in equal in terms of what? Knowledge? Experience? Skill level? I am sure you don’t assume that but it would be worth clarifying.

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