Week Review 10

Week Review 10

Learning is not the aquisition of information, but the making of connwctions between chunks of knowledge, the making of meaning. The same is what we all tried analysing the tweetorial, adding meaning to the data, because as it seemed, the algorithms do not yet do this for us – although I am convinced they will at some point.

One of the main challenges we face as humans is the automatic process of our brain, producing, yes creating patterns, wven where none are. You could say this is the algorithm of our brain and we must learn to be aware of this and teach ourselves to see the complexity of the world, see that everyone is unique and different.

What do current algorithms do? Put a label on the individual? Or break up perceived groups?

Do algorithms help us be the best we can be? Or do they make the same mistakes we make ourselves, yet with unseen efficiancy.

And do we actually know what we want algorithms to be?


The past two weeks, I was undatisfied and unmotivated. So many many topics I want to work on, yet not enough time, not enough energy and not yet producing the results I want to see myself producing.

I believe we need a new type of Humanism to prepare ourselves for a better world. Trans- or Posthumanism are more a danger than anything else.

Why is video in education not what it should be? Why is it not professional?

Spring is here. There is work to do. Motivation reestablished.

One thought on “Week Review 10

  1. Hello Dirk, thanks for this blog-in-two parts.

    I’m glad you’re feeling more upbeat about things again.

    ‘So many many topics I want to work on, yet not enough time, not enough energy and not yet producing the results I want to see myself producing.’

    Are there topics you think might suit your assignment? Let me know if you want to chat about this at any time – by e-mail, in your blog, Facetime or whatever.

    ‘What do current algorithms do? Put a label on the individual? Or break up perceived groups?’

    I’ve just posted under your really nice ‘Dirk’s bookshop’ post from last week. Something I’m thinking about is whether the suggested (or sought) efficiency of the algorithm and automation might have the effect of diminishing impromptu opportunities for learning? This is prompted by your point about water cooler conversation: if algorithms promote a culture that privileges learning and activity that can be categorised and captured, does this work against the valuable opportunities for conversation and subsequent community that happen in a more haphazard way?

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