Commenting on Stuart’s blog

This fits nicely with our conversation about what’s bubbling away beneath the surface.

My perspective of this course community and its activity is different from other peoples’ perspectives but we take our own as fact regardless of the possibility of it being wrong due to a narrow filter of view.

Going to make a pot of tea and watch this, thanks

Eli

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Commenting on Stuart’s blog

Well it happened. I’m on a photography MOOC and I got sucked in. I’m loving it.

The community has been quite quiet over the first week but I’ve been asked to join a facebook group so hoping that’ll be a bit more lively.

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This is indeed one of the fears of choosing a MOOC on a subject you are interested in, getting caught up. Do we have time to dedicate our student lives to two courses? Can one serve two masters?

I don’t want to give up my MOOC when I have written my netnography piece, it’s a really interesting MOOC and I feel like I have a connection with the instructors.

On a side note, why do I say instructors on a MOOC and not lecturers?

Commenting on Renee’s blog

[…] notion of community cultures was introduced lightheartedly through a suggestion to Eli Eappleby-Donald that we use Hypothesis to peer annotate web documents for the course, a Twitter shout-out to a […]

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Commenting on Renee’s blog

Thanks for sharing these videos Renee. They are really helpful.
I’ve been feeling a bit lost and without guidance on this, and these videos definitely give me a starting point.

I think this may be quite an undertaking 🙂
thanks

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Peer support in our little community.

Commenting on Stuart’s blog

Oh now that could be incredibly interesting. How do you plan to stop yourself getting sucked in and becoming a proper MOOC participant?
🙂

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It’s been really interesting to watch people chose their MOOCs and I think the choices are a little telling of the different people on the group. Stuart’s sounded really interesting, just the kind of geeky thing I’d expect form someone using the handle @learntechstu

 

Commenting on Linzi’s blog

I agree Linzi, I also found the lack of discussion and connection over the first block to be very difficult and made it much harder for me to take in the themes and readings.

For my personal preferences of learning, social is very important and I will reach out to my peers as a matter of course.

Really enjoyed our skype chat and glad I could be helpful in bringing you into the digital education fold 🙂

Alfred – butler extrodonaire.

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Commenting on Helen W’s blog

I agree with the rethink Helen, there is too much weight given to learning spaces being a recognised, I hate to say official, place. One of the examples I use is that I often think about things away from the learning environment as it seems to help me process. A perfect example I used for a previous course is available on my media hopper channel, I set up a camera and chatted to myself about “learnification”. Biesta, G.J.J., 2012. Giving Teaching Back to Education: Phenomenology & Practice, 6(2), pp.35–49.

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Is my kitchen less of a learning space? It’s my main thinking space, my place where I concrete my thoughts…

Eli

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Commenting on Helen W’s blog

What an interesting observation Eli. I was really interested in Miller’s observations about ‘homo faber’: ‘the maker and user of objects, his self to a large extent a reflection of things withe which he interacts.’ (Csikszentmihalyi and Rochberg-Halton, 1981:1). I guess one of the key things for me is how little the interaction of human and tool/tech has been reflected in the design of pedagogical spaces or practice. Bayne highlighted this, noting how technology is often perceived as simply an enhancement of current practice. Key questions aren’t asked about how the ‘entanglement’ of learner and technology, of teacher and technology, perhaps requires a radical rethink of how and where we teach and learn.

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Commenting on Helen W’s blog

I really enjoyed the journey through technology. It’s too easy to forget that new educational technologies weren’t always digital, yet sparked the same debate about how they would ruin/change education and or the human mind 🙂

Eli

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