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Category: Block 2: Community Cultures

A Mini-ethnography

A Mini-ethnography

 

For the Community Cultures block we were asked to create a mini-ethnography on a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). I had never heard of this term and whilst reading multiple books and articles on the topic I enrolled onto a MOOC as both a learner and researcher. The block was tough. It topic wasn’t only new to me but I found it time consuming. Trying to balance the social media platforms, blog, MOOC and readings took up every spare minute. However, what began as murky waters has cleared to an understanding and appreciation of online education. There are flaws but nothing is perfect. The pedagogy for me is important as no matter the technology used teaching is still teaching but our task was to discuss the ‘community’ within a MOOC. I was anxious about this due to my presumptions and expectations of the ‘community’ through both the Stewart (2013) and Kozinet (2010) article. However, my experience was far from their descriptions. I tried to keep to the task and represent my experience but I don’t know about it being a ‘mini’ ethnography.  Please find my ‘autoethnography’ attached.

References:

Kozinets, R. V. (2010) Chapter 2 ‘Understanding Culture Online’, Netnography: doing ethnographic research online. London: Sage. pp. 21-40.

Stewart, B., (2013). Massiveness + Openness = New Literacies of Participation? MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Technology, 9(2), pp.228–238.

This article really struck a chord with me today. I had a challenging day at work and left feeling disheartened. The role of a high school teacher is not only stressful but draining. Unlike the complexity of having hundreds of students on a MOOC, high school students aren’t always motivated or self-directed learners. Every class profile is different and most have a variety of learning needs. You feel obliged to save every pupil and try your best to ensure that they have the knowledge and understanding (K&U) of the subject. It is times like these where I feel the use of a ‘flipped’ classroom with lessons or resources available online could provide more time and free class time for teacher-led discussions to solidify learning. Yes, we would need to rely on the pupil to have watched or read the resources online but the conversation could takes place in a social and peer learning environment where the teacher can assess their K&U in the classroom. The online process could also create a communal environment where pupils who may not be confident to speak in public would be inclined to share thoughts and information to each other behind a keyboard. In return the teacher can monitor discussion and observe process and engagement.

 

References:

Bayne, S. (2014) What’s the matter with ‘Technology Enhanced Learning’? Learning, Media and Technology, DOI: 10.1080/17439884.2014.915851 (journal article)

Bayne, S., Knox, J., & Ross, J. (2015). Open education: The need for a critical approach. Learning, Media an dTechnology, 40(3), 247-250. DOI:10.1080/17439884.2015.1065272

Stewart, B., (2013). Massiveness + Openness = New Literacies of Participation? MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Technology, 9(2), pp.228–238.

Words: Your Most Powerful Weapon

Words: Your Most Powerful Weapon

As a dance educationalist I work with a mass amount of young people with challenging behaviour. How I interact with them depends on that individual. It is so important to look at every aspect of a person. We need to listen. We also need to listen to what is not being said. I’ve spoke on many occasions of the importance of body language and that the body speaks a thousand words. As teachers we need to be more body literate. However, in an online environment where we can not read our ‘audience’ how does one know the techniques to use or what that individual is saying to us? How can we cater to the needs of a massive community?  If, people share a false, filtered or fragmented identity can we really identify with them? Without full interaction can we really ‘listen’ to everything that they are telling us?
Kozinets discusses our need to consider the participants relationship between the other person(s) and central consumption activity they are engaged in whilst contributing to the online community (Kozinets, 2010. p 31). We take on other identities during our disembodied online presence which could influence and promote fragmentation of identity.
“communicators are presumed to suffer from a reduction in social cues” (Kozinets, 2010. p23).
References:
Kozinets, R. V. (2010) Chapter 2 ‘Understanding Culture Online’, Netnography: doing ethnographic research online. London: Sage. pp. 21-40.

Liked on YouTube: Words: Your Most Powerful Weapon | Evy Poumpouras | TEDxStLouisWomen https://youtu.be/03FsTbkcxuI
Liked on YouTube: Mastered to master — restoring the power of words | Nathan Adams | TEDxUTChattanooga

Liked on YouTube: Mastered to master — restoring the power of words | Nathan Adams | TEDxUTChattanooga

The TED talk below is one that represents self determination and the importance of being literate. Has technology enabled our words to become disingenuous? When I read posts or conversations online I am baffled at what I read. I also know that it is easy to misinterpret or to assume another will know what one is talking about. Do we truly mean our words?
I am intrigued at the social psychological and experimental approaches between individual and group communities where attitudes, memory and beliefs may influence their perceptions or assumptions of another’s text.
References:
Kozinets, R. V. (2010) Chapter 2 ‘Understanding Culture Online’, Netnography: doing ethnographic research online. London: Sage. pp. 21-40.
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Liked on YouTube: Mastered to master — restoring the power of words | Nathan Adams | TEDxUTChattanooga https://youtu.be/kTvgZzCiTrQ
Liked on YouTube: New School – 3 Ways Technology Will Transform the Classroom: Goldman Sachs’ Victor Hu

Liked on YouTube: New School – 3 Ways Technology Will Transform the Classroom: Goldman Sachs’ Victor Hu

Online education is not just about how we use technology in the classroom, we can enhance learning through the devices such as iPads, computers and smart boards and monitor progress. Digital education provides opportunity for all learners to go further. We can also look at online learning  as a way to overcome environment, time and digital space. It allows learners to progress outside of the classroom through the computer systems, with the teacher presented as an avatar or learning promoted as self-directed in nature. In further education a course can be presented as a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) and the buzzword of MOOC  brings about debate of the sociocultural growth and spread of digital literacies. However, Stewart (2013) highlights “In a world in which mobile, digital technologies permeate daily life on a seemingly ever-increasing basis, educators may mistake the usage of technologies within learning environments for digital literacies practice.”
Technology can transform the ‘classroom’ whether in a physical classroom environment or online but the success is dependent on how this is facilitated and the ethos taken.
Liked on YouTube: New School – 3 Ways Technology Will Transform the Classroom: Goldman Sachs’ Victor Hu https://youtu.be/y17l-hxFz1M
References:
Stewart, B., (2013). Massiveness + Openness = New Literacies of Participation? MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Technology, 9(2), pp.228–238.
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Hi Eli,

The was a really interesting read and fascinating to compare with my own experience on an xMOOC.

If xMOOCs are to use peec-orrientated communications and process-focussed generation successfully do you feel that they could create the perfect balance of a MOOC?

Linzi

from Comments for Eli’s EDC blog http://ift.tt/2m2xKNT
via IFTTT

A photographer edits out our smartphones to show our strange and lonely new world

Turner (2005) cites Rheingold (1994) which describes the disembodied precincts of cyberspace and that we lost a sense of cooperative spirit when we gained an increase in technology. This week whilst looking at online community I have been immersed in the digital world. These days, I’m never seen without a device in my hand or laptop in front of me and sometimes all of my digital equipment as I multitask. I have never been so active online before and on so many forums. I feel exhausted. I am making a digital presence in several learning and social communities but I am withdrawn from my real life. I am forgetting to connect with the people around me and if I am, my time and focus is limited. Will I lose the community that I have built around me because of my ignorance and lack of manners? My phone runs out of battery and instead of charging it I leave it ‘dead’ in my bag. I am fearful that I am missing out online but remind myself it is only for an afternoon. Although, as I look around, I discover EVERYONE is on their phone. They are talking to each other whilst looking at and scrolling social media ON THEIR PHONE. I am frustrated at my real life community and myself. Have we forgotten to connect with the people in front of us?

“The process of ‘social shaping’ leaves a medium with a social form, an identity, which influences the way it is used and its impact on the world; it is never quite shaken off.” (Lister 2009, p176)

Reference

Lister, M. (2009) Chapter 3. Networks, users and economics. New media: a critical introduction pp.163-236, London: Routledge

Rheingold, H. (1994). The virtual community: Finding connection in a computerised world. London: Martin Secker & Warburg.

Turner, F.(2005). Where the counterculture met the new economy: There WELL and the origins of virtual community. Technology an dCulture, 46(3), 485-512. DOI:10.1353/tech.2005.0154

 

Are we just guinea pigs?

Are we just guinea pigs?

http://ift.tt/2l96yQm

Daphne Koller is enticing top universities to put their most intriguing courses online for free — not just as a service, but as a way to research how people learn. With Coursera (cofounded by Andrew Ng), each keystroke, quiz, peer-to-peer discussion and self-graded assignment builds an unprecedented pool of data on how knowledge is processed #mscedc

 

In Marshall’s paper he proposes the “ethical issues with MOOCs as the monetisation strategies of the various providers are developed” (Marshall 2014, p.256). Whether commercial or research based, consent and ownership of students work raises complication in how the data is processed, thus, in turn can cause limitations and constraints on validity. Marshall (2014)  also cites Burman and Kleinsasser (2004) on the conflicting loyalties between the teacher role, researcher role, the research process, the institute and the learning of the students.

 

References:

Stephen Marshal (2014) Exploring the ethical implications of MOOCs, Distance Education, 35:2, 250-262, DOI: 10.1080/01587919.2014.917706

Burman, M. E., & Kleinsasser, A. M. (2004). Ethical Guidelines for Use of Student Work: Moving from Teaching’s Invisibility to Inquiry’s Visibility in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. The Journal of General Education, 53, 59-79.