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New Social Network Eter9 Leads To Digital Immortality & Singularity?

Description: New Social Network Eter9 Leads To Digital Immortality & Singularity? … see more at Inventorspot.com
By Renha
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Apparently Eter9 uses artificial intelligence to learn to mimic individuals so that it can post in their absence, giving them ‘digital immortality’.

I find this creepy on multiple levels. It doesn’t promise immortality, just the illusion of immortality for others (not the person immortalised) – why?  What value does it add, for whom, and in who’s interest?

In the same way that Memory 2.0 felt ‘wrong’ to me (though, I’m still not sure I truly ‘got’ the full intended meaning), for me Eter9 raises questions about data ownership. Clearly those signing-up agree to donate data, but surely it would be naive to assume permanence within the terms and conditions of service? Users no doubt will not be able to withdraw their consent posthumously! And.. what about the right to be forgotten and.. the right not to be reminded? 

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transforming humans & human experiene through augmented senses, the Internet of things and ambient & ubiquitous intelligence [blog.futurefacts.net]
Description: The convergence of information and communication technology is a permanent topic in tech foresight. The material basis for the transformation probably will be a mixed reality of the already emerging Internet of Things, Ambient and Ubiquitous Intelligence – and the maturing new interfaces of wearable Augmented Reality.
By Renha
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Came across this infograph – think it helps with identifying ways in which we already use ambient intelligence:

Ambient intelligence is an emerging technology that brings together three contemporary fields of information technology:
1 Ubiquitous computing, in which increasingly small microprocessors are inserted into everyday objects such as clothes, vehicles or furniture to make them more interactive or responsive to user needs. 2 Ubiquitous communication achieved to ever more robust wireless networking technology.
3 Intelligent or adaptive user interfaces, which allow humans and computers to interact in more natural or personalised ways.
Gagglioli et al., 2003 cited in Miller, 2011, p. 222

Miller, V. (2011). Understanding Digital Culture. London: Sage

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Description: transhuman technologies

By Renha
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Comparing this to Williams & Bendelow’s (1998) assertion that bodies have become increasingly plastic‘, bionic‘,  communal or interchangeable,   interchangeable across species and virtual or hyperreal (pp. 79-85).. and Gray et al.’s identification of ‘restorative tools’, ‘normalising technologies’, ‘enhancing technologies’ and ‘reconfiguring technologies’ (cited in Miller, 2011, p. 212). Additions in the infograph appear to be ‘altering’ (i.e. genome editing) and lifestyle adjusting. The latter point is taken up in Williams and Bendelow (1998, p. 69), with the suggestion that ‘a new conception of “fitness” is being forged’, with ever-greater importance being placed on appearance and body presentation and the state of the body assumed indicative of character and mind:

“Today, the firm, well-toned and muscled body has become a symbol of ‘correct attitude’; ‘it means that one “cares” about oneself and how one appears to others, suggesting willpower, energy, control over infantile impulse, the ability to “make something” of oneself’ (Bordo 1990:94–5).” (Williams & Bendelow, 1998, p. 74).

 

 

Lifestream, Tweets

In Book Thirteen of the comic version of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? there’s a three-frame spread of Deckard waking up in the morning. In the first, there’s just an alarm clock beeping – 5am – and a hand reaching over to quieten it. Next “THE CLOCK TELLS YOU IT’S TIME TO WAKE UP” and in the final frame, “ONE MACHINE GIVING INSTRUCTIONS TO ANOTHER”. From this, some might infer that Deckard is a replicant, a machine receiving instructions from the clock. However, as I reached to quieten my own alarm this morning, when I used the biometric scanner to clock in at work and when I responded to repeated meeting reminder alerts from Outlook it felt much more like a statement about the robotization of humans! Though of course, my human performance, my efficiency, is enhanced by these technological tools.

Life stream, Comment on Posting for the sake of posting – is it worthwhile by eappleby-donald

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Hey Renee,

Q: Do you think that the requirement to post (as part of assessment) & ‘feed’ the lifestream changes the nature of engagement? (i.e. posting for the sake of it?)

Though talking about assessed forum contributions, Ke (2010) suggested that forced participation can lead to superficial, grade-driven interaction. Others (see Gourlay, 2015; McFarlane, 2015) have questioned the validity of focusing on and assessing observable, performative behaviours within social constructivist approaches, since this privileges a particular way of learning/demonstrating learning. It’s an area I spend a lot of time thinking about as a teacher, so interested to know your thoughts.

Yup I think that’s correct. I think the requirement of the lifestream blog has the potential to change behaviours and I know I have seen it in myself. I wouldn’t usually post to twitter so much but I’m forcing myself to for the sake of the course. Hopefully, things will calm down as we all get to grips with what’s expected of us.

With assessed participation, yep absolutely, I’m watching colleagues on other courses where participation is part of the mark and they are all grumbling about having to write “something” in the forums even though they have nothing to say.

I understand why we would have marks for participation, but I think by doing that we also force some learners to behave in ways they wouldn’t normally when learning?

I have also been watching the community building for our course and I think that because we don’t have a discussion forum, we were trying to form bonds on twitter with its woeful character count. I guess it will be interesting to watch as things progress and see what happens 🙂

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Life stream, Comment on Posting for the sake of posting – is it worthwhile by Renee Furner

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I’ve been thinking about this point too, Eli. Perhaps it was just setting up – certainly I know I posted just to check if IFTTT was working as I’d intended it to.. and then again (& again) because I had not gotten IFTTT right. But then..

Q: Do you think that the requirement to post (as part of assessment) & ‘feed’ the lifestream changes the nature of engagement? (i.e. posting for the sake of it?)

Though talking about assessed forum contributions, Ke (2010) suggested that forced participation can lead to superficial, grade-driven interaction. Others (see Gourlay, 2015; McFarlane, 2015) have questioned the validity of focusing on and assessing observable, performative behaviours within social constructivist approaches, since this privileges a particular way of learning/demonstrating learning.  It’s an area I spend a lot of time thinking about as a teacher, so interested to know your thoughts.

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The larger question is perhaps, how do the affordances of technology naturalise themselves within communication protocols, so that ultimately they change our expectations of participation and are integrated within education? And how can we ensure that pedagogy, rather than technology, remains at the helm?

Lifestream, Comment on Reminders by Philip

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Thank you Renee, very interesting and compelling comments. As I was reading I thought of another example of the space-presence concept. Since we have been Tweeting about Blade Runner, I have been reminded of the Star Trek series. As the Enterprise moves through space, it simply occupies a given point at a given moment of time. It takes up space, nothing more really. It is only when the ship or its occupants interact with that space, or with other objects or entities within that space, that actual presence is felt.

I find this a difficult idea sometimes, especially when my brain tries to interject all kinds of possible exceptions and scenarios. But, I still like to think I’ve got a decent concept going that is workable.

In any case, I like your statement that you must become an “active community member”. To me, and perhaps to oversimplify, this means I must make my presence in space known in some active, overt manner (quantitative), in order for my presence to have any qualitative meaning.

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